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Will McCain Run on the Presidential Public Financing System?

Yesterday, McCain became the first candidate eligible to receive funding from the presidential public financing system, having applied to the Federal Elections Commission earlier in the month.  He has not yet said whether he will accept the matching funds. 

It could be a lifeline for his campaign and make the system once again functional in the primary.  However, it is a tough call for McCain’s campaign since the system badly needs updating and he would be the sole candidate running accepting the spending limits in exchange for the federal funds. 

The fact that the system is still being considered in the primary shows it’s not dead yet.   However, it also highlights the real need to breathe new life into the system so that it can be an asset to more of the qualified candidates who could opt in and stay competitive.  Read what must be done to improve it on White House for Sale.

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Comments

Brenda B

I hope all of our US campaigns switch from the lobbying fundraising system to a public funded one. Then our candidates would have to BUDGET to get their message/campaign heard and PROMISE CITIZENS RESULTS instead of lobbyists. This is the way of the future.... all citizens will be represented and politicians will be more management savvy than our deficit spending past.

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